Graphics:
9.2
Gameplay:
8.0
Sound:
7.3
Control:
7.9
Replay Value:
7.5
Online Gameplay:
8.5
Overall Rating:
8.0
Publisher:
SCEA
Developer:
Guerrilla Games
Number Of Players:
1-24
Genre:
FPS
Release Date:
November 15, 2013


If you’re wondering why Killzone: Shadow Fall isn’t pulling down the scores its predecessor earned, I can explain it easily and succinctly— it isn’t as good as its predecessors. That feels very strange to say, especially considering the talent of the developer and the new PlayStation 4 hardware. I was expecting a shooter tour de force, a defining FPS experience, one that further illustrates the lacking of the competition (in regards to the campaign, at least). Instead, I found a merely competent albeit very pretty shooter that oddly doesn’t excel in the areas in which I fully expected it to excel.

There’s no denying the beauty of the visual presentation. Even though the gargantuan scope and wonderful design of Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag is close in terms of graphical achievement, Shadow Fall is the best-looking PS4 launch title. The richness and detail of the environments are amazing, the animations are tight and realistic, the effects are a joy to behold, and some of the more open vistas are extraordinary. However, I felt somewhat disappointed with the character modeling and body animations during cut-scenes, which don’t scream “next-gen” to me.

The audio suffers from a significant and disappointing balancing issue, in that the effects and music often drown out the much softer voices. There’s also a volume discrepancy between the soundtrack and battle effects, which I was able to improve by fiddling with the sliders in the options menu. The voice acting is solid but in truth, I thought the acting in Killzone 3 was better. This is not what I was anticipating from the PS4’s leading launch title, although the sweeping, often driving orchestral score is indeed impressive. Much like certain elements of the graphics, the sound leaves a lot to be desired from a next-gen standpoint.

Here’s the point, which lies at the core of this review: For a variety of reasons, Killzone: Shadow Fall is not indicative of a new era of interactive entertainment. It’s a good, even great, shooter. It can’t be condemned for failing to try new things, because it does try new things, even when those fresh elements don’t quite pan out. The mechanics are borderline flawless. The variety and effectiveness of the weapons are much appreciated, the OWL drone works exceedingly well in most situations, and the fun factor is always there. Oh, and let’s not forget that the campaign gives you more bang for your buck than either Battlefield 4 or Call of Duty: Ghosts .

All of that shouldn’t be ignored and throw out the window; hence, I can’t in good conscience score the game below an 8. It’s worthy of that score simply due to its sheer entertainment value and rock solid competence as a shooter. Exactly why it doesn’t reach expected heights is more complex. Simply, the game just doesn’t feel like it’s “next-gen.” Granted, that term is highly subjective and may mean something entirely different to you than it does to me, so let’s just say this— besides the graphics, the game doesn’t do anything that can be considered more advanced. That is to say, there’s nothing here that we haven’t already seen in the PS3/360 generation and in some cases, it’s a step back .

For instance, I don’t recall the AI being this lame-brained in either of the previous two Killzone iterations. Enemies charging blindly ahead, “hiding” right out in the open, sometimes perfectly tuned in to your location, other times completely oblivious to your movement. I’ve seen foes stuck in place, running near a wall, unable to break free. I saw one enemy who apparently couldn’t turn around to face me in time; he tried unsuccessfully to do it, and it was pretty funny. Squadrons of supposedly highly trained military soldiers head my way in a straight line, not even bothering to attempt to flank or conceal themselves. That wouldn’t even pass muster on the PS3, let alone the PS4, which is supposed to usher in a new level of gaming.

Then you’ve got the story, which is another major aspect of the game that sort of falls flat. It’s unfortunate, too, because I really liked each of the last two narratives in the franchise. This one has a lot of potential but it never really goes anywhere, and when it tries to be emotional and dramatic, it usually comes up short. For instance, in the opening sequence, you start off as a young boy, and you’re following your father in what will prove to be a vain attempt to reach The Wall. The ensuing tragedy is predictable but even so, it could’ve been done with more punch. Better timing and better choreography would’ve helped a lot; as it was, I felt almost nothing watching that scene unfold. It just felt forced and artificial.

Factor in the less-than-stellar voice performances and the merely average writing, and you get a campaign that just doesn’t grip you. Now, I know I’m making the game sound awful but in my defense, it was a bit of a shock to play something that only looks “next-gen.” When I think of a new generation of gaming, I think of an overall improved experience; better AI, better storytelling, better choreography and artistry, better core mechanics, more innovation, etc. It’s disheartening when what is arguably the most important title for a new console fails to be “better.” It seems content with just being good, and it doesn’t even try to remove the kinks and flaws that have plagued gaming for years.

But as I previously clarified, the game is still well worth playing. Movement has some weight to it; not to the level of Killzone 2 , but it’s still noticeable. Sprinting, crouching and aiming down the sights is all crisp and responsive, and I love that no weapon seems useless or superfluous. You’re always encouraged to try new weapons and you’re also rewarded for exploring your environment. With areas that are significantly larger than ever before, this really opens up the adventure. Not only are there a variety of collectibles to nab (newspapers, comic book pages, etc.) but it adds another dimension and dynamic to the standard FPS combat.

It’s too bad that the AI doesn’t seem to take advantage of the more open landscape, but that doesn’t mean you can’t. You can stealthily approach or you can go in guns blazing; you can try to surprise the enemy, or you can snipe from afar. In this way, there’s more battle diversity than we’ve ever seen in the series. That variety is enhanced by the OWL drone, which I was convinced I’d dislike but in fact, I love it. I find it only slightly annoying that I have to use the touchpad (I think I’ll always despise touchpads) and the OWL not only proves helpful, but invaluable. It can attack foes, hack enemy terminals, act as a shield in times of emergency, and even offer a handy-dandy zipline. All four functions are available at the start, and all are just a swipe away. I have yet to encounter an issue with this setup.

Going in, I was worried that the team would be too much in love with the OWL and consequently overuse it in the campaign. But that isn’t true; in fact, they don’t use it enough . Then there are some fresh segments – such as the one that has you floating around in zero-grav – and these are interesting, but not especially well implemented. The campaign is quite rewarding because the challenge is relatively significant and you never feel that you’re doing the exact same thing twice. Despite the lacking story, this is one campaign that you won’t regret playing, and that’s worth saying for any FPS. The single-player doesn't feel like an afterthought.

As for the multiplayer, I think it’s great. In many ways, it’s even better than the single-player adventure. I haven’t come across much in the way of instability (which is always key for a new game), and playing with friends is a blast. The balancing seems to be just about right, and the diverse modes are wildly entertaining. Warzone is where it’s at, because it lets you toss a bunch of different modes into the mix. Guerrilla really shines when it comes to map-making, and these 10 maps are all absolutely exceptional in my estimation. There are plenty of different corners and avenues to explore, and learning the ins and outs of each map is wicked fun.

The amount of customization, particularly with Warzones, is catnip to online multiplayer aficionados. Alter the parameters, change the number of capture beacons, specify classes and weapons; basically, tailor each match exactly how you see fit. There are so many options that you could play for months and still experience plenty of freshness online. This is critical because these days, the multiplayer component absolutely needs such quality and variety. I was concerned that the multiplayer wouldn’t stand up to Battlefield 4 or Ghosts but actually, I’d rather play Shadow Fall online than either of those other shooters. It’s just more dynamic and interesting, despite the sad removal of the jetpack.

Killzone: Shadow Fall is a good game, and it hints at a rosy future for shooters and video game in general. I remain disappointed at the surprisingly outdated drawbacks, such as audio balancing, silly AI and occasionally unconvincing acting, but the result is still agreeable. The graphics are a definite highlight, the OWL drone works very well, and the more open and immensely detailed landscape infuses the campaign with branching, compelling energy. The multiplayer succeeds in delivering a stable, highly diverse experience that most competitive buffs will really enjoy, and the map design is unparalleled. I don’t overlook the shortcomings, but if all that isn’t worthy of a positive review, nothing is.

The Good: Beautiful, extremely detailed environments. Majestic and effective score. Great weapon selection. OWL drone is a big plus, and should’ve been used more. Appreciated attempts at new gameplay mechanics. Combat is well paced and wildly entertaining. Multiplayer is diverse, energetic, and addictive.

The Bad: Default sound balancing is way off. AI is dated and disappointing. Story and some of the acting is ineffective. Doesn’t “feel” next-gen.

The Ugly: “Enemies stuck in walls? Come on…really? This is the all-sortsof-fancy PS4, right?”

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Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago

I wonder if the development of KZ for Vita hurt this one. That is, GG formed another GG studio that maybe took some key members to support it. I can only speculate.

But as it is, this still looks like a game I'll eventually get and play. I need a tech showcase title for a new new next-gen console.

I'm wondering why the control rated lower, though.

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

Some of the non-shooting sections (like that zero-grav segment) didn't have the best control.

Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago
bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

Personally the control is super solid. This is the best example we will see of the implementation of the DS4 too. Dont agree with that at all. Its super tight, super solid, response is great and again they utilized every single button including the touch pad and speaker in very precise, conscientious ways. The zero G parts were good too considering its zero gravity. The way they handled a feeling of weightlessness in the controls… spot on in my opinion.

Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago

how much zero grav stuff is there in the game?

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

So far ive only come across one section. Could be more.

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

No, bigrailer, the control elements of the non-shooting parts are not great. Most critics have acknowledged this.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

We agree to disagree. Im not much a fan of many critics because every review I read contradicts another. This game has super solid controls far beyond the shooting. As far as FPS go, doesnt get much better.

Killa Tequilla
Killa Tequilla
9 years ago

So it got a lower score on controls because of a part in the game?

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

The reviews don't contradict each other. If they did, we'd see a huge variance of review scores for Killzone, and we don't.

xenris
xenris
9 years ago

The thing that I find contradicts itself is that some reviewers aren't harping on Ghost and BF4 for not being "next gen" enough. Then when it comes to games like Knack and KZ they say this isn't next gen.

No one can define what next gen is going to be. Is it a crime to make an old school platformer on the PS4 just because it can do more?

I want innovation but I also don't want my favourite genres to die out or not appear on this new console.

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

Well, BF4 and Ghosts weren't really designed for next-gen. Killzone was exclusively designed for a next-gen console, so there is a definite difference.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

The scores are not thay similar to eachother its very inconsistent going up from 50 to 90. What is contradicting are the reviews themselves. Even more so many reviewers complained the on rails KZ3 story, Shadowfall opened up but without much credit. One reviewer said its "good, solid, but forgettable". Huh? Usually solid represents a game you go back to, like the mp aspect. One review gives it a high score the other doesnt sound unhappy with it but gives it a lower score. Its not representing much honestly. This isnt all about KZ either.

This is a very much what is happening on metacritic with every review. Im beginning to look at the user reviews more because its easy to pick out the trolls. I can get an honest definitive answer. The critics in this industry are all over the place. Ive argued that there needs to be more consistancy if reviews should be taken seriously. How does on reviewer give it 90 and the next a 50. We should trust the reviewers? Nah.. thats why I stick around here, I may disagree sometimes but atleast your honest.

Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago

i agree the scores are varied, but Polygon's 50 is out there by it's lonesome… it may be considered ….. an OUTLIER muwahaha! =p


Last edited by Temjin001 on 11/19/2013 2:18:12 PM

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

I would agree of there wasnt 3 – 60's, and 2 – 67's. This is every example of a game thats being scored with a progressive trend From 50 to 90.

How does someone get any real indication from that?


Last edited by bigrailer19 on 11/19/2013 2:43:36 PM

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

Then don't bother reading reviews, because you can almost always find statistical outliers like the ones you're talking about. You can even find 7s for the Uncharteds. So what?

The reviews for Shadow Fall are not contradicting each other on the key points, and that includes the control of the non-shooting sections, which is only average.

Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago

sorry bigrailer, I didn't see the clump of 60's there from the overview page. So yah, 50 isn't quite an outlier by my reckoning either.

NaughtyDog
NaughtyDog
9 years ago

Great review Ben. As far as the enemy's getting stuck on the wall I haven't experienced that yet, more as to having to run back and take cover as the enemy is flanking me. Suprised me that you experienced that as for me the opposite. I love the look of the the game and agree facial visuals could have been better and game is a little confusing on what to do or go as for example climbing back up the rocks in ch.2. I like the environment change and the view from space. My favorite effect so far is from the sun, for those playing it you know just to cool.

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
9 years ago

As long as it lets approach things how you want instead of forcing you to play every firefight on rails like KZ3 then that's no way it's gonna be as bad as that one in my mind.

Beamboom
Beamboom
9 years ago

That's exactly what I'm thinking too.
Plus, I never found the story in KZ3 to be much to speak of either so better visuals plus more freedom to play your game pretty much equals a better game imo.

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
9 years ago

Amen brother.

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

Better graphics and more freedom equals a better game?

This isn't The Elder Scrolls, Beamboom.

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
9 years ago

As an FPS it's already the most shallow kind of game available, so personally I do put a premium on graphics and freedom of approach.

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

That's not what automatically improves an FPS, especially one that is campaign-driven. Better writing, acting, cinematography, and highly polished set pieces is what makes it better.

You wouldn't make Uncharted better by making it less linear, and it didn't work for Killzone, either.

xenris
xenris
9 years ago

Uncharted isn't a "shooter". Its an action adventure game, with platforming and puzzle solving.

You should compare this to BF4 or Ghosts, both of which have better voice acting, and cinematography but ultimately fall prey to being extremely linear, and the stories very Micheal Bay in that its BOOM BOOM EXPLOSION PEW PEW BANG. They are formulaic and boring even if they are well acted. Freedom in those games would be welcome. Shooters the last gen were mostly shooting galleries, and that fact that KZ changes this up by allowing more than 1 approach is refreshing. Its not "next gen" but shooters haven't been doing this for at least half a decade.

Now I will admit here that I haven't play this KZ, but everyone I personally know in real life and the consumers on gamefaqs and some online friends I have seem to agree that this is a better game than Ghosts and BF4 in the SP department, and for some the MP as well too.

I would also argue that KZ isn't campaign driven they just are one of the last devs who think its worth putting effort into both SP and MP, something which CoD and BF don't seem to care as much about.

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

I didn't say Uncharted was a shooter. I said it was a linear game bolstered by elements that make linear adventures better. That's the way Killzone has always been as well. You don't make a linear game better by turning it into a non-linear game; I know everyone thinks that these days, but it really isn't true. Doesn't make anything better; just makes it DIFFERENT. And in this case, not in a good way.

If you want all games to be just about open-world exploration, fine. But I don't. And I don't think it would benefit a series that never tried to be freedom-oriented in the first place.


Last edited by Ben Dutka PSXE on 11/19/2013 11:06:24 AM

Beamboom
Beamboom
9 years ago

I guess that in a polarized world "more freedom" is equivalent of "COMPLETE freedom", so it MUST mean Skyrim.
But those of us who are able to grasp nuances around us realize that there is quite the gap between "no freedom" and "full freedom".

I'm sorry Ben but I am so tired of you taking *everything* to the extreme. It's just so tiresome to constantly having to correct your claims as to what others say mean to you.

None of us here is thinking about turning the game into a sandbox. None.
What we talk about here is obviously a few *notches* more workspace than what was given us in KZ3. Take the Crysis games. That's a few notches more freedom. To have a few routes to choose from, a handful of plausible strategies, or to be able to make some sort of a plan, and not just traverse a map following a stippled line, like we more or less did in KZ3.

So no. Not Skyrim. It's not all either Uncharted or Skyrim. Not in our world.


Last edited by Beamboom on 11/19/2013 11:17:47 AM

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

The only one taking anything to extremes is you, Beamboom.

Give me an example of a time when your recommendation to make a game better DIDN'T involve more freedom. Just one. You have an admitted problem with linear games; hence, you think every game is better with more freedom.

Logically, the assumption one would make based on your opinion is that the more freedom we have, the better it will be.

Let me tell you what's tiresome-

Listening to the same exact thing over and over. Being part of an industry where everyone's answer is "more freedom" and better technicals. I'm telling you what Killzone is. I'm telling you it would be better by making the narrative side better, and everything that goes with a linear adventure. I'm saying get better acting, storytelling ability, cut-scene cinematography and choreography, better pacing, better artistic presentation.

I'd like you to explain to me how that's taking anything to an "extreme," and then explain how your constant recommendations for making EVERYTHING better with more freedom doesn't constitute exactly that: Extreme. How MUCH freedom you want is irrelevant; apparently, it's your cure-all fix to any problems plaguing any game, and that includes games that were NEVER ABOUT FREEDOM IN THE FIRST PLACE.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

Trust me on this beam, the freedom involged in KZ Shadowfall alone made it better than KZ3. It is Crysis2 esque. Youll enjoy it, anyone who wanted more from KZ3 has gotten it with Shadowfall. GG listened even so much as to add stealth after being heavily criticized for the stealth in KZ3. They redeemed KZ on every level.

Its just not being appreciated. "I want cake"!

Beamboom
Beamboom
9 years ago

Ben, the problem is that you've been doing that false assumption with me every single time – and I do now mean *every* time – we've discussed this. It's like your mind is reset between each time.

I've so many times carefully explained that I do not want every game to be at the extreme end of player freedom. Many of my absolute favourite games – games I would describe as close to *perfect* for their time – are not sandbox games or anywhere near being so.

It's like if I should tell you that you believe every xbox gamer is a casual gamer while all Playstation owners are really hardcore and oldschool. You would then explain to me that your opinion is not like that.

But then, the next time Xbox is the topic I would start by saying, "well you believe that EVERY Xbox owner is just a casual gamer, and that's just not right cause (and bla bla)". You'd then again explain to me that's not how you see it.

But next time the topic of Xbox gamers comes up I'd again claim to know that you believe ALL Xbox gamers are just casual gamer newbies.

Surely I would rather soon get on your nerve, right? Well: That's you!

What World is saying is that he thought KZ3 were too railed. Not that it is not an open world Skyrim shooter clone. Just too railed. And that is what I respond to, and agree with.

So when we now see that this next Killzone seem to give the player a tad more workspace, we applaud that and state that we think that can only make the game better.
That's what's said here. That is the topic.


Last edited by Beamboom on 11/19/2013 2:17:35 PM

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
9 years ago

boom goes the dynamite

Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago

I like the more tactical feel of more open battle fields. It gives me more to think about. More positional freedom on how to plan my attack. I love that about Crysis. Though Crysis 3 sort of botched the AI awareness thing. I can be kneeling in tall grass and still be spotted in a split second from 50 yards away.


Last edited by Temjin001 on 11/19/2013 4:18:49 PM

Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago

I also think it's not totally fair to the KZ games to describe them as always like hallways, or so linear they're devoid of any tactical freedom. There are several levels that give you open battle fields but it's ratio of openness to closeness is more lopsided compared to Halo or Crysis. I also don't think it fair to describe something like Fallout or Mass Effect as always open without any constraints (because we're all ADD sufferers). In both games you accept objectives and then once arriving at the destination a sequence of linear events kick off. Sure for an overarching story things might not be as finely nit, but hey these are ACTION games, meaning less talk and more shoot and decide.


Last edited by Temjin001 on 11/19/2013 4:33:05 PM

Ben Dutka PSXE
Ben Dutka PSXE
9 years ago

Apparently, you're not reading anything I write. So I'll try to break this down as simply as I can-

— I didn't say you wanted everything like Skyrim. I've never once said it. I said you prefer open-ended games and you do.

— Every single time I've ever seen you recommend a possible IMPROVEMENT for a game, it inevitably involves more freedom of some kind, or a technical improvement. That's it. Never a mention of any of the artistic aspects, which can only lead one to assume that you don't care about them (i.e., story). If you'd like to say that's not true, fine, but as you never recommend this as a necessary improvement, it's hard to believe otherwise.

— I say not every game will benefit from more freedom. I said Killzone won't be automatically better with more freedom because that's not the kind of game it is, but you don't seem to care about that.

— A casual gamer is more likely to own an Xbox (especially in the US) than a PlayStation product. That is so glaringly obvious based on the mainstream popularity of Microsoft that it's beyond debating. Hardcore gamers will own an Xbox. Casual gamers will own a PlayStation. However, the two groups are most certainly not spread evenly across both platforms. To claim otherwise is the epitome of naivete.

Akuma_
Akuma_
9 years ago

While it's nice to see healthy debate, Ben and Beam, you guys are like a married couple.

I have seen you guys argue about those exact things sooooo many times.

xenris
xenris
9 years ago

Not everyone thinks that more freedom is better. But in the case of a shooter like this, more tactical options are welcome otherwise the game starts feeling like a shooting gallery and like it is on rails which is only fun for people with no brains.

I've been playing FPS games since they were conceived, and I had played shooters at a competitive level for the better part of a decade, I have a bit of an idea of what makes them good and what makes them bad considering I have played most of the FPS games on the market.

I can say without a shadow of a doubt that yes, if you take a linear shooter and give people more ways to tackle an objective then yes that is an improvement.

Could the story elements have been improved? I'm sure they could have been, but I would rather have a fun playing SP campaign that had fun missions which you could tackle several different ways and a mediocre story with hit or miss voice acting. Than the boring on rails crap we get with CoD, and BF SP campaigns, that are on rails, have insane aim assist, and feel like nothing more than shooting fish in a barrel. Oh but the story is neat and there are a lot of "epic" set pieces and explosions.

I'm a gamer its about the gameplay first, everything else second, and it sounds like KZ gets the gameplay right.

Beamboom
Beamboom
9 years ago

Ben,
sorry but you need to wind down a bit. Your last paragraph shows you completely misunderstood my post – something that makes your opening quite unintentionally comical.

I asked how you'd feel if I repeatedly did the same wrong assumption and ignored all your explanations on how you really saw it, using a false assumption on your views on Xbox gamers as an *example*.
And you reply with telling me I'm wrong and explaining how you really view Xbox gamers 😀 Surely you can barely have skimmed through my post.

Please read again – in a calmer state of mind – and I think you'll get what I am saying. Don't worry – my words don't bite anyone, nor are they aggressive. I did read through my post again now and it's not *that* badly worded.

Now to your other points:
I don't think I am alone in thinking that a bit more options or alternatives in how to solve a given map in a shooter is a bad thing, per default. In fact, I think it is a very common opinion. Yes, I am practically depending on it to fully enjoy a game – you're right in that – but look around you and you'll see *many* saying the same. It's a GAME, after all. We like to do stuff and come up with clever ideas.

And I have never considered Killzone to be particularly interesting artistically. Had Killzone 3 been a movie it'd be an instant turkey.
So to me, Killzone is just "a pretty shooter". I do not in any way expect this franchise to suddenly completely change in these respects. And as a "pretty shooter" then yes, I would think that a bit more room for me to use my head could only be to it's advantage.

Cause the less interesting the story is (told) the more *else* a game needs to offer. That is, in my humble opinion, something like the closest to "a rule without exception" we can get.


Last edited by Beamboom on 11/20/2013 7:58:03 AM

JROD0823
JROD0823
9 years ago

I agree with Ben on this review.

I haven't beat the game yet, but I've not been blown away by anything I've seen as of yet.

Having said that, this is still a nice jumping-off point for Guerrilla Games to make an even better game next time.

greg238
greg238
9 years ago

I have shadow fall it pretty good no were near as good as killzone 2 or 3 but still worth having

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

Good review. Some things I must be looking past – the controls in particular. I dont know that theres a game out there aside from a few that have better. Either way im enjoying it. If I had to do a review its getting a high 8. Merely based on the fact that every complaint in kZ3 is now taken care of, the team listened and delievered what the fans wanted, not to mention is just a fantastic shooter that excels in a lot of areas.

Fabi
Fabi
9 years ago

I dunno, maybe I was expecting too much, but I found the visuals disappointing.

There were so many blurry and last gen looking textures. They stood out like a sore thumb, sometimes you're in awe about how good certain lighting looks and then you take a closer look at the wall or something and you see textures that scream out PS3.

The one that really looked ugly to me was the scene when you're hanging from the helicopter, those damn buildings just looked bad.

I'm pretty disappointed when it comes to graphics, I don't usually base games on graphics, but one of the most exciting parts of a new generation is seeing how good the graphics look, and I have yet to see something truly great. I think RYSE is the only game that truly looks next gen to me, even though it looks like it sucks.


Last edited by Fabi on 11/19/2013 1:52:06 AM

Killa Tequilla
Killa Tequilla
9 years ago

The game looks too good.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

Thats non sense.

Fabi
Fabi
9 years ago

That's your opinion, and that's fine. I just found the visuals too inconsistent.

But you guys can't tell me I'm lying about the textures being lo-res sometimes, or the structures that are far away looking like 2-D cut outs. If there was a way to post pictures here, I would post some.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

You dont have to I've posted many "shared" videos and seen all that myself. The sight distance is amazing, and that includes the details in the horizon. Sorry everything has dimension and everything has large amounts of detail.

I wouldnt have made it a point to share those videos if I wasnt experiencing something epic.


Last edited by bigrailer19 on 11/19/2013 2:12:26 PM

Fabi
Fabi
9 years ago

You're really telling me the buildings in the distance look amazing? They look just like the buildings in the distance in Uncharted 2. They're not really believable, they don't look good enough to make you believe you can actually go there. One look is all it takes to realize the quality of them is far lower than what's up close.

Also, I just got done with the sniping mission, and I noticed some really silly pop-up and there was a part where you're on a container and you can look down, and the ground where the big mechs are walking on looks so bad… it's just inconsistent. Maybe you have really low standards or something. I just played Metro on PC, and was way more wowed by the graphics on that.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

My standards have nothing to do with it at all.

Im sorry but I cant agree with you. But thats okay, im sure you'll be wowed at some point.

Fabi
Fabi
9 years ago

It's not about agreeing dude… you can't disprove pop-up & blurry textures.

Anyway, pretty fun game. I'm not a huge fan of the openness of it, but the OWL and the controls are on point as always.


Last edited by Fabi on 11/19/2013 9:00:10 PM

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

Tell that to Ben, about the controls.

Fabi
Fabi
9 years ago

It's kinda crazy, I actually loved the touch pad for using the OWL. It actually really immersed me, it felt like I was really controlling it in real life.