While the PlayStation Network is back up and running and most of the fans have returned, Sony admits this is the only beginning.

Sony Computer Entertainment Europe boss Andrew House spoke to OPM during E3, and he first recognizes that Sony still has "a long way to go to restore consumers' faith in the brand" and it's important "to be worthy of that trust." As for the future, such an attack has made it plain: Sony must remain not only vigilant, but hyper vigilant:

"It's taught us that we have to adopt a state of hyper vigilance. We have to think very seriously the resources we will put behind this vigilance."

House adds that the company remains "humbled and extremely grateful" that so many consumers continue to put their faith in Sony, and he assures everyone that the Welcome Back program was just the first "early steps on a long road." Maybe by the end of the year, all of this will be little more than a nasty memory…

Subscribe
Notify of
19 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
The Doom
The Doom
9 years ago

Yes

Mornelithe
Mornelithe
9 years ago

Sony should actually look into absorbing a network security firm. They've never really had need in the past, what with being solely about entertainment…but, now that they have big business in their network, they should really have it nailed down by professionals who've been in the biz for years.

Would probably do them, and the end-user good in the long run.

maxpontiac
maxpontiac
9 years ago

When I worked for Pepsico, they had their own internal security and I was just under the impression that all large firms did.

Perhaps I was mistaken.

Mornelithe
Mornelithe
9 years ago

Every major company has an internal network security division, however, as is the situation here, we're not talking about Sony's internal infrastructure. Rather, we're talking about a fringe network, the PSN, which really has no access to Sony's more sensitive internal networks (I would imagine.), this is entirely theory, of course.

Basically though, Sony's never had to really deal with a public network, so they really have no clue, when it comes to securing that network. If they absorb a company that's been doing network security for years, they can immediately start nailing down all external access points, logically and preemptively, rather than what's occurring now which is all completely reactionary.

Btw, no you weren't mistaken heh. Simply that the internal network security, isn't going to be the same division as the security team that'd work on PSN.


Last edited by Mornelithe on 7/5/2011 10:59:40 AM

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Ben,

Wasn't there a story about Kaz Hirai getting a bit of a promotion recently, and House moved up to SCE chief, not just SCEE? Pretty sure that Ken Kutaragi finally retired from being Honorary Chairman of SCEI in the various management moves at the end of June, although he's still a technology consultant for Sony.

BikerSaint
BikerSaint
9 years ago

Highlander,
Yes you did read that, I did too.

And I had sent it to Ben last week but it wound up being one of the articles he didn't use.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

This is the first I've heard about it since PSN came back up… That tells me during the incident people just wanted something to talk about, and/or that it has mostly blown over by now.

Excelsior1
Excelsior1
9 years ago

the length of the outage and the extent of the breach was what was really surprising. hopefully, we never see anything like that again. that was not a fun time to be a sony fan.

bigrailer19
bigrailer19
9 years ago

Well it's in the past no reason to drag it out any longer…

It's been a great return, and a great time to be Sony fan for sure!


Last edited by bigrailer19 on 7/5/2011 11:51:36 AM

Looking Glass
Looking Glass
9 years ago

Highlander mentioned this before and I agreed. That Sony's best hope is quality. And quality is definitely in the works.

The PS3 has a number of very high quality games in the works such as The Last Guardian and Uncharted 3 (which could very well be a killer app for 3D gaming), among others. And it also has an extremely promising device in the upcoming Playstation Vita. What makes the Vita even more promising is that handheld games are becoming increasingly popular among both developers and the general public. And that's not even taking into account the upcoming killer software lineup for the Vita (which includes a Call of Duty game). And hopefully the upcoming Sorcery will provide the Playstation Move with a much welcome killer app.

For a number of reasons, the greatest of which by far being the Tohoku disaster, Sony is not in the best of shape right now. But on the other hand by all accounts Sony is going to weather this storm and come out of it stronger.


Last edited by Looking Glass on 7/5/2011 10:58:19 AM

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Sony (taken as a whole) isn't in as poor a shape as some elements of the media would have you believe. They took an extraordinary loss on their balance sheet for the last fiscal year that masked profitability. This coming year should be considerably better, apart from anything else, the Playstation business is making money.

BikerSaint
BikerSaint
9 years ago

According to this article, the very last of the PSN outages is finally going back up tomorrow for Japan…….

Japanese PSN back on Wednesday

http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2011-07-04-japanese-psn-back-on-wednesday

Sony Computer Entertainment Japan has announced that the PlayStation Network will return to full functionality in Japan on July 6.

Japan is the final territory to be restored after the shut down at the end of April, a full month after Europe and America. Services have been returning since the end of May, but this final move will see access to the PlayStation Store reinstated.

One reason for the Japanese delay was the demands placed on Sony by the government and credit card regulators, which included preventative measures to ensure the security of the system.

Gamer Girl Gemo
Gamer Girl Gemo
9 years ago

Oh, wait. The PSN did go down… Didn't it… Huh. Looks like I forgot about it.

YashaZz
YashaZz
9 years ago

Same here.

Completely forgot it was ever down when the network got back up.

Ha, I guess I'll forgive Sony for anything. =>

___________
___________
9 years ago

not according to kaspersky, the worlds leading PC security and antivirus experts.
they did a interview a while ago stating sony had plenty of warnings of security loopholes months in advance!
even called there lack of care and interest in security criminal!
why do i get the feeling that if this was any other company they would of had 1000 lawsuits filed against them?
oh but sony, ohhh noooooooo WE ABOVE THE LAW!!!!!!!!
who said you cant buy the judicial system?
theres NOTHING a full briefcase cant fix!!!!!!!!!


Last edited by ___________ on 7/6/2011 4:02:44 AM

Beamboom
Beamboom
9 years ago

LOL you could have been one of the more… colourful characters in GTA. ūüėÄ


Last edited by Beamboom on 7/6/2011 7:29:21 AM

Looking Glass
Looking Glass
9 years ago

There he goes again. Kaspersky doesn't provide security for multi-million user networks. Their primary business is developing anti-virus software. Therefore their word on this matter is hardly definitive or anything along those lines. And they are definitely NOT legal scholars. They have no business saying what's criminal and what's not.

And it's not as easy to hold getting hacked against Sony as you think. Why? Because not long after Sony was hacked the same thing started happening to a lot of other people too, including the freaking FBI. The security measures that Sony had were industry standard. What happened to Sony is merely one part of a much larger picture involving the entire industry.

And Sony is indeed dealing with at least a few lawsuits as a result of the fiasco, although it's unclear if they'll even make it to court. In any case no matter what the circumstances when someone commits a crime against someone else it's always the perpetrator's fault (in this case the hackers) and not the victim's. In any case could the victim have been better prepared? Perhaps, but it doesn't matter because it's still the perpetrators fault.

Looking Glass
Looking Glass
9 years ago

And another thing is that stuff you mention has no direct relation to this article. It looks like you posted on the wrong thread.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Yes, but Looking_Glass, kaspersky is …um…like….um…one of the top…like…20 network anti…security…um virus thingies. They really know their stuff man…

ūüėČ

Sorry, Even with Antivirus, Kasperky is a little prone to overstating things and just a tad bit of scaremongering (to drive their business…?). But as you say, they are hardly the top echelon of network security firms, and I rather suspect they are regurgitating some of the stuff that an other security 'expert' or was it 'researcher' was coming up with in his own self serving statements about the matter some 6 or so weeks ago. It wasn't particularly accurate, valid or helpful then either.