We don't normally cover hacking and other issues – primarily because we don't believe in giving certain people any attention whatsoever – but this is sort of an FYI for everyone.

After the recent hacking and piracy problems, Sony has decided to take some security steps: first is the upcoming firmware update 3.56, which will include "a minor update that adds a security patch." Firmware update 3.55 was also a security patch of some kind. But something else may be looming on the horizon, as reported by TechEye ; it's the as of yet unconfirmed report that Sony is looking into serial keys. In other words, they will ship unique serial keys with each game it ships, thereby causing a big hurdle for those who wish to steal their products. Unfortunately, this didn't work very long on the PC platform so we'll have to wait and see if Sony comes up with another plan of action.

Also, let's not forget that big publishers like EA and THQ now have the Online Pass program, where you have to enter a code – that is only available if you buy a game new – in order to play online. …how many codes are we going to have to put in? Just to stop the rampant problem-causers? 'sigh' Whatever happened to just playing games?

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thepill
thepill
9 years ago

This update is taking FOREVER!!! Damn pirates, could screw up an orgasm.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

I bet that the PSN servers are getting hammered by people trying to download the firmware update and wouldn't be surprised is dome morons were trying to disrupt that service at the same time.

thepill
thepill
9 years ago

the update crashed 3 times during download, but just now finished. The successful try took about 20 min, and another 5 min to install.

GuernicaReborn
GuernicaReborn
9 years ago

Uh oh. I'm d/l'ing this update to a USB drive and installing it to my PS3… it'll be faster that way.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Wow, it took all of 5 seconds to download and about 5 minutes to install. Nice.

Read point 4 of the Terms of Service when the process asks you to accept the terms, it's interesting.

GuernicaReborn
GuernicaReborn
9 years ago

WTF that's awesome Highlander. Are you on a fiber optic network or something? Of course, if anybody could get the most out of their ISP, it would be you.

Not gonna lie, I'm a little jealous right now.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Nah, I was fooling myself. I just realized that I spent about 5 minutes looking at their new Terms and Conditions and it was probably downloading in the background. So it seemed like seconds but was actually about 5 minutes. Still 5 to download and 5 more to install, not bad at all.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Wow! I came within about 5 minutes of a fairly permanent bricking. within 5 minutes of completing the firmware install, my power went out. I didn't think about it until just now. That is not a pleasant thought.

maxpontiac
maxpontiac
9 years ago

Indeed. Those that do things to the PS3 such as hacking, stealing and homebrews, I wish upon them a bricked console.

BikerSaint
BikerSaint
9 years ago

"Damned crappy Verizon DSL"

I did my update in the middle of the night about 4:30AM & it still took me about 20 minutes & another 5 to install.

kevinater321
kevinater321
9 years ago

Damn i hated the security codes for pc. I think Doom 3 had one and when i tried to reinstall it after getting a new computer i couldn't. Hopefully you can enter this code multiple times, like how you can download the same game more than once on psn.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

If I were doing this… I'd make it a code you enter once, and then you download an unlock from PSN. That would be coded specifically by your PSN id and whatever other secure things Sony wants to do. Just like anything else, you could download that to multiple systems. Then when you try to start the game, it looks for the encrypted unlock key and attempts to verify the key. If it verifies, the game plays, if not, it doesn't. That way, every unlock file is unique to the PSN ID, and never exists in an unencrypted form, making it very hard to crack.

In a way it'd be like any game you buy from PSN because it is activated on your system, and you can activate it multiple times.


Last edited by TheHighlander on 1/26/2011 9:50:43 PM

FatherSun
FatherSun
9 years ago

Supposedly this is the route Sony is taking. The 5 system rule. Boy how I wish that Sony anticipated this possibility and had some sort of secondary key that could be activated remotely somehow. This is madness.

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
9 years ago

But if you dont have internet access you are boned.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

@Fathasun,

I bet they do that and more with the PSP2 and any PS4 that follows eventually.

@Bandit, I haven't figured that one out yet myself. Unless they put some kind of key-station in retail locations that is essentially a kiosk where you can enter your code and get an unlock file on a small USB stick or something like that. I can't see how else it'd work.

Something like DECE's UltraViolet (formerly digital locker) play anywhere DRM might work too.

Saffleur
Saffleur
9 years ago

@Fathasun No, This is Spartaaaa!

Seriously though, does it matter what they put in? We're all gonna go and play it anyway right? That's not saying we're sheeple but I'm not giving up something I know I've put a good chunk of money in to.

I'm not in a rush to get the update, PS Plus + automatic DL = win.

___________
___________
9 years ago

not only PSN but do what antivirus software does, create a unique key consisting of your HDD model, PSN ID and MAC address.
only problem is if you change your HDD.
ok, maybe scrap HDD and use something not changeable like the serial number.

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
9 years ago

That sounds like a huge pain in the ass, Highlander, and i wont buy any game that treats me like a criminal.

Anti-piracy on PC games doesnt stop pirates, it just makes it a huge pain for people who actually bought the game. The same thing will happen with the ps3 if they follow the same model. A lot of people who bought Spore for PC had to use a crack because their legitimate serial for it wouldnt work due to the multiple levels of verification. Ubi made an AP system for Assassins Creed 2 on pc that required a connection to their server to play, even just the single player campaign. One day their servers went down and people who paid for the game couldnt play but pirates kept on playing without even knowing there was a problem.

Instead of screwing around on the customer side of things, just make a more secure console. It took pirates ton more time and effort to crack the ps3 open, and sony should be proud of that, but dont make it a pain in the ass for people who actually buy their games.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Bandit, they may not do this serial key thing at all – apparently 4Chan was one of the sources of the rumor which in and of itself indicates that it may be a hoax.

Besides the latest firmware fixes the descryption code to use random numbers properly and they are using a new private key. The public keys have already been pulled from the firmware update, but the new private one has not been reversed yet (I'll say yet because you can't say it won't be). Plus I've read comments and reports on a number of sites that suggest Sony did something in the secure processing vault and that PSN will start performing more thorough authentication checks to detect compromised systems. It's believed that the messaging from PSN will be encrypted and authenticated so forging the replies will be nigh on impossible. Whether that's true or not, I don't know, but I have read it from two separate sources in the PS3 homebrew community. If that is the case then it means that if you don't have the official Sony firmware 3.56 or higher installed, your PS3 will not be able to access PSN when this is enabled. DNS tricks shouldn't do much to help whenever they decide to start using these deeper authentication procedures. It also means that Sony will have the means to detect and potentially ban compromised systems at will. One of the sources I read seemed to think that Sony can remotely initiate these checks at any time as long as your PS3 is connected. Like I've said before, you might not be able to prevent tampering forever, but you can make your system tamper evident.

thj_1980
thj_1980
9 years ago

this sucks eveytime they release an update i am excited but only until i find out it is another security patch. I like the idea of playing video games for free, but the process is too much for me to do, so i'll not head into there. If I were to get this I'd have 2 systems 1 main one, and 1 secondary that is dedicated to hacking, to play single player games only!

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
9 years ago

If you were to get what? You kinda need the update.

frylock25
frylock25
9 years ago

posts like this will not score you points around here man. hacking is not cool, its basically stealing. you do what you want but that mentality that you just showed is the reason we are getting to this point.

Underdog15
Underdog15
9 years ago

Which will help you on games that come out before now… each disk has the most recent firmware update at the time the game was released. You'd have to get it eventually anyways.

FatherSun
FatherSun
9 years ago

Couldn't update on the fat PS3 so I gave up for the night. I will take a wait and see stance till later to avoid any inadvertent system problems. The slim has been in use for the last few hours and thankfully no issues have arisen. Will update later. Hope it will update before the Home Killzone invasion.

Dam Security Researchers!

thepill
thepill
9 years ago

my update was on a fat, and it took almost an hour to get it to download. No problems after install so far. (fingers crossed)

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Security Researchers – yes, they would call themselves that wouldn't they….

😉

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
9 years ago

I am a security researcher, I want to test the building security at Square Enix.

Vitron
Vitron
9 years ago

Ha, I wonder about that 🙂

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
9 years ago

I wont buy any game that has a serial number.

FatherSun
FatherSun
9 years ago

Good Luck with that. It seems that we may have no choice if we wish to enjoy the Exclusive Assault of 2011.

Underdog15
Underdog15
9 years ago

Why not?

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
9 years ago

I shouldnt be inconvenienced because Sony can't make a safe OS. I wont be able to borrow my friend's games, nor will they be able to borrow mine. You can forget about used games, trading, anything other than playing the game yourself.

Underdog15
Underdog15
9 years ago

mm… that's not necessarilly quite true. Based on the references to the potential of a 'digital key' being similar to how PSN purchases are organized, you should be able to put your game on anyone's system you would trust with your PSN id to get it assigned to their system.

So you will likely be able to assign the key to 3-5 different systems between you and friends. You would trust your PSN id on a friends PS3 to install a key. You wouldn't give it to some random guy over EBAY. They just want to prevent piracy, copying, and transfer of ownership. They don't want to limit how you, the purchaser, handle your copy.


Last edited by Underdog15 on 1/27/2011 12:07:21 PM

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
9 years ago

So i have to give up my accounts privacy (even if to a friend) just to share a game? No thank you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First-sale_doctrine
"Copyright, as the name suggests, is the right to copy a work of some form. If one resells or gives as a gift a book (or CD or DVD) that one has bought, a new copy has not been made, therefore it is legal under US copyright law."

Publishers have no right to dictate how i can or cannot sell something i own. If i want to sell my copy of a game they shouldnt charge the 2nd owner for a new key. If you think they should then you should probably start rallying against libraries. Can't have people reading books they didnt pay for, how will the authors survive :0

Underdog15
Underdog15
9 years ago

First off, you quoted Wikipedia under a section that has absolutely no citation. It's not citable or reputable. Law is not black and white, as you wish it was. If they REALLY were motivated enough, they could take you to small claims court and win $60 off you. They never will do that, but they WOULD win. Small scale musicians have done that to local bars/clubs playing their local music, and won.

Second, stop comparing physical goods to digital media. To people who understand this differentiated piece of law, you sound really silly. So these lame claims that it's the same as used cars, books, or dental floss, just brutally make it obvious that I'm again entering into an argument with someone that lacks the ability to understand the most basic concepts of law. And I will get nowhere, because you'll just argue based on information I've already explained is NOT legitimate… And around in circles we'll go… I'm a sucker too apparently…

They aren't the same, and modern law hasn't caught up yet to define the differences throughout the whole of copyright law. It's only written in parts. But enough to make both you and the publisher right. And rest assured, some day, your case will be wrong.

Third, while there are too many loopholes that make it impossible to stop you from reselling a game or playing a used copy, the law is so inefficient for both parties, that game publishers ALSO have enough holes to say they own the data and can charge for additional keys.

So while you continue pretending your type 2 morality gives you some sort of entitlement to declare who deserves the money for the production you now use (not own), which apparently is fine, eventually the publishers are going to have enough and do what you're so upset they're going to do.

And guess what?!?!

Used game buyer? They DO NOT CARE ABOUT YOU!!!! Oh no!!! You aren't going to buy their games anymore?!?! Well, who gives a flying rats buttocks. You never got them any money in the first place!

So stop pretending like you making some vow to not buy their games ever again is going to make some sort of difference. Losing you from the modern game market isn't hurting any of the publishers. You're the only one missing out of the future of gaming.


Last edited by Underdog15 on 1/27/2011 3:18:57 PM

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Bandit's favorite reply in copyright discussions is doctrine of first sale. However that doctrine was established in law as a precedent during an era of physical reproduction of copyright materials. Because physical media such as books and vinyl records do deteriorate, there is an inherent disadvantage of buying a used book or record. This represents an incentive to continue paying for the new item even though a used one is available. The courts recognized that restricting the ability of a person to sell a physical article based on the copyright of the content contained in the article.

In the digital age, the used item doesn't deteriorate, and there is no disadvantage in owning the used copy because it's identical to the new one. This removes the balancing effect that physical deterioration has prompting people to buy new. So, doctrine of first sale doesn't necessarily apply. So far the copyright office has indicated that digital goods are not covered by the doctrine of first sale for these reasons.

Games fall into an odd area because they are sold as physical items but do not significantly deteriorate, because the content is digital. So discs are covered by the doctrine, but downloads are not.

Fane1024
Fane1024
9 years ago

Just because something is the law doesn't mean it should be.

Slavery was the law of the land at one time.

The exception for digital goods (software) is ridiculous and should be repealed.

This coming from someone who rarely buys used games and almost never re-sells. I also have never rented a game nor swapped games with friends. I pay the developers for the games I play.


Last edited by Fane1024 on 1/29/2011 2:51:59 PM

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

Fane,

I realize that you may not catch this reply, but I do have to post it anyway. The doctrine of first sale cannot and will not apply to digital goods because digital goods remain perfect no matter how many times they are passed from consumer to consumer. Because every copy made during any transfer of a digital work is perfect. Consumers can take a copy of a digital work and sell the 'original' to someone else, keeping their copy. The copyright holder loses completely in that regard because unlike the books and records that physically deteriorate, there is no reason for anyone to buy new if they can buy a perfect copy from someone else for cheap.

Copyright laws exist to protect the creators of works and ensure that they are fairly paid for their work. In a digital age, allowing the doctrine of first sale on digital works utterly destroys the point of copyright in the first place. If you do not protect the rights of content creators to be paid for their effort, they will not make the effort.

Copyrights exist for a reason, and it's a compelling reason for anyone interested in artistic innovation in any media.

Alienange
Alienange
9 years ago

Like I want to enter serial keys when I get a new game. Yeesh. There's got to be a better way.

FatherSun
FatherSun
9 years ago

What burns me up is those who defend the blatant theft of the Security Keys. Modify, alter and change all you want to your property. I have no issue with that. Sony sold you the hardware and the hardware only. The data belongs to them no matter how some chose to twist the words to justify such actions.

Temjin001
Temjin001
9 years ago

Man, this could really destroy the used game re-sell market.
THe sad thing is, with a digital medium like this, it seems to be one of the only ways a company can protect itself from this form of loss
.
While I think the concept of marketing a digital and easily duplicable product is more of the fault of the business who chooses to try and protect itself only by intellectual property laws and stop-gap solutions to hackers, I also understand that I value the gaming entertainment we have today and I'm willing to play according to these economic rules to have access to evolving content going into the future. I would hate for gaming to de-evolve or reduce it's momentum due to massive piracy problems that erodes away at the bottom line and ultimately hurts the health of the industry.

Do the right thing for gaming. Pay for your games and support the industry that supports you with the kind of entertainment you want to play.

Anonymous
Anonymous
9 years ago

Only a loser would be proud of his pile of worthless pirated games.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
9 years ago

You know, in all those discussions we've had on this side about DRM, copy protection, piracy and used games. I made the point time and again that if people didn't modify their behavior, this was one of the possibilities. The hackers have simply accelerated this. The content providers *have* to protect their products. That is the only way they can make a profit from their work. Since so many people seem hell bent on copyright infringement through piracy, it's only common sense that this – or something like it – would happen. Perhaps this time I won't get down voted into oblivion for stating the blindingly obvious.

DemonNeno
DemonNeno
9 years ago

Not to mention the "loyalty" fees these companies pay to Sony to ensure this exact problem (hacking) won't keep them up at night. I'm all for trying games before buying them if I'm skeptical about it, but that's what rental stores are for.

Hackers simply enjoy the challenge as it tests their abilities. Unfortunately, hacks have to be somewhat clarified to seal their works legitimacy. What's more unfortunate are the douchebags who think this is an acceptable way of getting their game on..

If your so damn hell bent on stealing these games, rob the store instead of the honest community. Pussycats!


Last edited by DemonNeno on 1/26/2011 10:56:33 PM

FatherSun
FatherSun
9 years ago

@Highlander, Common Sense is not Common.

Downvoted for that? I must've missed that conversation. Glad I did.

Underdog15
Underdog15
9 years ago

@FATHASON
Be glad you missed it. I'm pretty sure I was the only one that sided with Highlander. Anyone else that agreed didn't say anything and/or didn't say much.

It's not like it's some complicated issue. People just have this false sense of entitlement… that they deserve to buy things or pirate things in a way that hurts the industry.

Really, though, people just get upset when you challenge a particular stance on morality. For some reason, in it means a person has to say they may have been wrong or have been doing something illegal, they feel like their self worth will depreciate if they shed the former self and donne a new one. When, in fact, the best way to become a more worthwhile person is to constantly look for more ways of improving otherwise questionable behavior.

In this case, pirating, stealing, and buying used. All 3 take profits away from the publishers and developers. The only difference is that by buying used, you're a sucker for paying. Might as well have just stole or pirated it and saved some cash.

But lo… and behold… my and especially Highlanders predictions are beginning to flourish. Perhaps sooner rather than later thanks to pirates. Funny thing is, people will STILL defend their stance as if they've somehow achieved this otherworldly enlightenment of justice. It's as if these people think if they paid for it, it automatically becomes legit. Well… in fact no… you're just a sucker.

Next thing to happen? Used game stores will either begin to sell new only, or become novelty stores.

Anonymous
Anonymous
9 years ago

I'm going to wait a few days before I download anything. I wasn't planning to go online for anything anytime soon anyway.

Simcoe
Simcoe
9 years ago

This isn't going to be good for those in the game rental business ie. Blockbuster.

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
9 years ago

Gamefly = collapsed.

Looking Glass
Looking Glass
9 years ago

Blockbuster has already been going down the tubes fast ever since Netflix showed up.

As for Gamefly, I think it will be just fine. Gamefly in fact goes a long way toward making piracy unnecessary and impractical. Which is not to say that the vast majority of PS3 gamers would resort to piracy even if this was not the case. They wouldn't. All hail the fanboys!