We're still not sure of the price, but we do know you might have a slightly cheaper option.

Although Sony didn't mention it during the unveiling, it seems that consumers may have two choices when it comes to purchasing the Next Generation Portable (NGP), depending on region: according to what SCEE boss Andrew House told Eurogamer , there will be two NGP models in Europe; one with 3G and one without.

"The first thing to clarify, which I'm not sure the presentation did a perfect job of doing today, is that all of the devices will have Wi-Fi capability; a separate SKU will have 3G. So the user gets a choice. Wi-Fi is available wherever, which clearly is the most important aspect of connectivity and that connected experience; 3G will be a subset of that."

Right now, Sony is "working hard" to solidify 3G partnerships with local wireless carriers in Europe and in Japan, Sony has an exclusive contract with NTT DoCoMo for 3G service. We don't yet know if there will be two models of the NGP in North America, but it seems confirmed for Europe, at the very least.

If you did have the option, would you spring for the 3G-enabled one? And how much more would you be willing to pay?

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TheAgingHipster
TheAgingHipster
10 years ago

If the 3G provider in the U.S. is anyone but AT&T, I may actually get that model and cancel the 3G on my cell phone.

Also, Wireless N or G???

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
10 years ago

N, from what i read. The only benefit you'll get is the added range. Very few wireless connections in the US are fast enough to take advantage of N.

SmokeyPSD
SmokeyPSD
10 years ago

I read N defiantely in the specs. And as I said in another article I'm defiantly for the 3G option. A always on option is a must for me.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

Bandit, does that added range also come with better signal quality so the data rates don't drop off as fast as they do with b/g connections?

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
10 years ago

Highlander:

In theory, yes. In the real world i have no idea, theres too many variables.

In the most basic form, a signal loses half of its strength as you double your distance from it. So if you are getting 50% signal at 100 yards you'll get 25% signal at 200 yards, 12.5% at 400 yards, 6.75% at 800 yards, etc. Of course walls and humidity can affect the signal's strength as well.

So with the better range of N (idk what the numbers are exactly), you'll have less dropped packets at any given distance than you would with G because the signal will have degraded less. That might be as little as a 5% increase in strength at a certain distance, but that translates to less packet loss, meaning less packets being sent twice, and consequently faster data transmission.

My guess is that they put N chips in because:
•Buzz. People like the newest thing even if they wont use it to its potential.
•Its cheap and several years from now it might make a huge difference. Putting it in now saves them from jumping through hoops with the FCC years from now.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

Probably so – regarding the cheap thing. I suspect that the majority of the additional features like BlueTooth, WiFi, Camera, GPS, etc… are coming from a cell-phone heritage. Just about every system on a chip maker includes all of that stuff on the same chip as the CPU/GPU. I'm sure that they have used something of that nature to manage all the I/O requirements, it would be tons cheaper, and highly integrates reducing the overall component count on the board.

NoSmokingBandit
NoSmokingBandit
10 years ago

I wonder how much more the 3G version will cost…
Iirc, when the iPad was released Apple was paying about $7 per 3G chip set and charging the customer $100 more for it. Granted, theres driver and software work that has to be done, but thats still a bit much.
Most people will probably just use their phone as a wifi hot-spot instead of having two 3g bills to fuss with.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

If the 3G enabled model comes with 3G connectivity that Sony has negotiated, I'm in, but if I have to obtain a separate data agreement with a mobile operator, I may stick with Wifi only.

Bonampak
Bonampak
10 years ago

WiFi is def the best choice. In terms of reliability.

3G sucks in certain cities of the US (works fine in NY, LA and other major cities, though). Being a rather slow streaming experience.

ABUrabad
ABUrabad
10 years ago

I know what are u referring about in the US since plans and agreements are very strict , but still 3G plans in other countries are so cheap enough so they can be obtained by every NGP holder , as in my country we may pay 5$ a month up to 24$ with no limitation for data plan ,


Last edited by ABUrabad on 1/28/2011 3:48:34 PM

Zorigo
Zorigo
10 years ago

3g is optional?
3g just means wireless net everywhee right. well i don't think that matters all too much to me, just as long as i can use the wifi i'm cool tbh.
so for me this is good news, means i can look at the non 3g SKU and it'll probs be cheaper too.

*prays for good price*

Bloodysilence19
Bloodysilence19
10 years ago

i know 4g would make the ngp more expensive but why Sony wouldn't go with 4g instead of 3g. a lot of cell phone companies are doing the 4g thing now, don't know why Sony wouldn't jump on it and do 4g.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

They may do so by the time they have to submit a model to the FCC for approval in the US.

ABUrabad
ABUrabad
10 years ago

in some areas the 3G+ are fast enough up to 14 Mbps which is too high for online gaming requirements at this moment , at my home I'm using an ADSL offer with a 512 Kbps which really can provide me satisfying experience

so I think for a portable devices a good 3G connectivity would deliver for me much better experience whn it comes to speed

but I need to refer also that the differences between the 3G and the 4G not only related to speed but also the abandonment of circuit switching for the 4G (which I dont understand how) in other words 3G is a mix of circuit and packet switching network while 4G is only a packet switching network

I just googled it so I need some one to explain it for me how???

Zorigo
Zorigo
10 years ago

i think that it'd just get too pricy

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

@Abu

Circuit switching is a type of networking where the source and destination have a dedicated circuit established to connect them. If the circuit is disrupted, it has to be re-established. Even though there is no physical connection on a cell network, circuit switching essentially means that a constant link has to be maintained between the smartphone and the network. It's like having an open line, anyone else trying to use that line get's a busy tone. Now, the receiver in this case may only be the local cell tower or a local router. But even if the sender is sitting idle, that link is maintained preventing other users from accessing the network.

Packet switching is more flexible because it doesn't need a dedicated circuit or connection. Packet switching is also called connectionless because a constant connection isn't required. The sender sends a stream of data packets to the network addressed to the destination and the network routes them in whatever is the best way for it's current load. So each packet is sent and routed individually. This is pretty much how the Internet works (in general terms) and it's much more flexible and robust. You don't have to maintain a continuous connection to the network. So long as the sender and receiver can connect to the network as needed, all is well. Because it's not necessary to maintain a continuous link, many more users can be accommodated on the same network.

kraygen
kraygen
10 years ago

As far as I understand 4g isn't even a reality in all honesty. In most area's of the US 3g doesn't even work half the time. Most companies selling "4g" are selling pipe dreams. The likely hood that you would ever actually be able to utilize 4g would be slim to none.

Qubex
Qubex
10 years ago

In reality 4G does exist, it is called LTE; BUT the engineering organisation that represents all the major wireless equipment makers (such as Nokia, Ericsson and Huawei), 3GPP have categorised LTE as a 3G technology.

4G, in its purest form, is currently defined as E-UTRA. 4G promises up to 100mbits per second on a downlink cellular connection whilst moving through a cluster of mobile cells. This is achievable in the lab at this stage and quite experimental.

Problem is the higher the throughput the better the quality of signal needs to be in order to sustain a continuable bit stream at that speed. In the real world, this is difficult due to anomalous radio interference which has a devastating effect on signal to interference levels.

NGP does include an LTE receiver, however, it may support HSPA+. Unfortunately the specifications that are known do no specify it supports HSPA+ or not. If it just supports R99 (UMTS) then that is not very good I am afraid.

Q!

"play.experience.enjoy"

RobiinzZ
RobiinzZ
10 years ago

Well i dont think the ngp needs 3g, especially since hardly anywhere has it. I know its started to get up and running in the US, but we dont have it in the UK and not sure about europe or japan.

RobiinzZ
RobiinzZ
10 years ago

4G*

sticklife
sticklife
10 years ago

Depends, if the 3G is pay once then you have it as long as you have the psp2 or if it cost more then you keep paying. If it's a one time payment then I would get the 3G one for sure, maybe even at 100 extra, maybe.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

What if it was a NGP/PSP2 specific Mobile-PSN monthly subscription?


Last edited by TheHighlander on 1/28/2011 1:17:36 PM

sticklife
sticklife
10 years ago

Depends again, If it's like 5 bucks a month maybe. I have ps plus maybe they'll give me a discount. =D

AcHiLLiA
AcHiLLiA
10 years ago

Good to hear that their would be two models. I hope the non 3G model will be a good price point. No need for 3G, some people could live with it.

mexgeo86
mexgeo86
10 years ago

I think I can live without 3G on the handheld, but I would like to hear pricing on that option.

eLLeJuss
eLLeJuss
10 years ago

Yes. I'd rather have 3g on that beast.

daus26
daus26
10 years ago

I never really get this 3G/4G stuff as I'm still quiet old school with my cell phone. Is it a one time paid thing, or is it monthly? If it's a one time thing, then I would go as far as $100 more, depending on the PSP2's internet capabilities. If not, I'm going with Wi-Fi since it's at least N network.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

3G/4G is a mobile data network, think mobile broadband. 3G phones have voice and data capability over that network. Because it's carried over Cellphone signals, it's pretty much universally available in most cities and towns and a large chunk of the road network and the more populated rural areas too. It's tolerably fast, but not particularly fast.

TheAgingHipster
TheAgingHipster
10 years ago

The bigger concern, to me, is how much data the 3G plan provides in relation to how much data the multiplayer and downloads would require on the NGP. If it's like most plans, the 3G isn't unlimited, and I foresee a lot of angry multiplayer fanatics when they get their overage bill….

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
10 years ago

I wouldn't want to pay for access to 3G, it might be useful sometimes but there's usually a wifi spot nearby. I'd go with the one without and save some dough.

And also, find a way to make it play with hotspots where you have to log into a webpage first. I can't use my PSP online at hotels because of that damn issue.

Alienange
Alienange
10 years ago

Only way around it is to bring your laptop and run it as an access point for your PSP.

Yeah it sucks, but if you're in a hotel you might already have your laptop with you.

WorldEndsWithMe
WorldEndsWithMe
10 years ago

Guess I gotta figure out how to do that, thanks for the tip.

Alienange
Alienange
10 years ago

Search youtube for Laptop as Access Point For Use With A PSP

Bonampak
Bonampak
10 years ago

Some other stuff that came out in an interview with Hirai:

3G through NGP will not allow for phone use.

Hirai said that it would be "nonsense" to use a device of this shape as a phone. Because it would require a headset or changes to form factor, they left out any such phone functionality.

TheHighlander
TheHighlander
10 years ago

If that's the case I can see a lot of folks getting smartphones with a wifi hotspot and opting for the Wifi version.

TheAgingHipster
TheAgingHipster
10 years ago

Maybe the PSPhone will have have that capability. It would certainly encourage the more tech-savvy gamers to buy both.

Zorigo
Zorigo
10 years ago

some part of me is thinking of getting THIS when they drop price and release a slim or some new colours or something… you know, the INEVITABLE.

Lawless SXE
Lawless SXE
10 years ago

Well, considering I'm planning to take a road trip around the country at the end of the year, with my PSP, and possibly my NGP beside me, 3G would make a lot of sense. That being said, I'll have to see how much I enjoy online play and access to the PSN when and if my broadband application goes through. Cost may be a barrier, but if it comes down to a month-by-month PSN subscription for 3G connectivity, I think I'd be down, provided it doesn't bump the initial price up too much.
Peace.

Alienange
Alienange
10 years ago

3G sounds good if it works like the Kindle. If they're planning on charging a monthly fee then forget it. Nothing's wrong with wifi, I can stick with that.

Mr Bubbles IGR
Mr Bubbles IGR
10 years ago

i would go with the 3g version…but i would want to know if i would have to pay monthly to keep the 3g aspect of it running. Otherwise the wi-fi model.

kraygen
kraygen
10 years ago

If you have to pay for 3g at all, I'll pass it up, because where I live you only get 3g access about half of the time. Not sure why, but sometimes it's there and sometimes it's not. So I'd just stick with the wifi only.

___________
___________
10 years ago

price and release date thats all i want to know!
i wont be getting the 3G one though, someone asked on the EU PSN blog if you buy the 3G one will there be monthly costs and they replied yes but were not ready to go into details on that.
sounds like there might be contracts involved, like what apple has done with the Ipad.
if sony think im signing up to a 24 month contract just so i can get 3G on this thing they have another thing coming!
this whole thing is stupid too, why bother with 3G when 4G is due to launch in a few months?
first 4G compat phone is from samsung if i remember right, suppose to be releasing around september.

SiriusScaper
SiriusScaper
10 years ago

Actually the first 4G phone was the HTC EVO 4G. I would prefer wifi for the simple fact that I can turn my EVO into a 4G powered wifi hotspot at any time… ūüėõ